PRI Articles

Joel McDurmon on 1 Corinthians 13-- A Response - #10

                     
In our last article in this series, we noted how Ephesians 4:8-16– which is all but universally admitted to be parallel with 1 Corinthians 13– did in fact – contra McDurmon-- predict the cessation of the miraculous revelatory gifts of the Spirit.

This series of articles is in response to an article by Joel McDurmon Head of Research at American Vision in Powder Springs, Ga. Contra “church history” and the creeds, McDurmon claims that Paul, in 1 Corinthians 13, does not discuss the end of miracles in an objective sense. He goes further and claims that 1 Corinthians 13 has no eschatological content: “I think that the whole endeavor to see 1 Corinthians 13:9ff as an indicator of any major eschatological, doctrinal, covenantal, or revelatory shift is to miss the point of the passage entirely.”

Read more: Joel McDurmon on 1 Corinthians 13-- A Response - #10

Duck Dynasty and Media Hypocrisy

By now, most Americans are aware of the controversy of the Duck Dynasty patriarch and his comments regarding gays. He had the temerity to express his faith, and actually call the gay lifestyle a sin. Well, A&E, the host of the Duck Dynasty program immediately suspended him, calling his comments inappropriate and unacceptable. It now appears that it is possible that the family will perhaps withdraw from the show, or that A&E will actually cancel the program.

Read more: Duck Dynasty and Media Hypocrisy

Joel McDurmon on 1 Corinthians 13-- A Response - #2

This is the second part of a series examining an article by Joel McDurmon in which he addressed the question of the charismatic, revelatory gifts, and particularly 1 Corinthians 13. In that article, McDurmon denied that 1 Corinthians 13 discusses the end of the charismatic gifts, and he denied that the text has any eschatological content: “I think that the whole endeavor to see 1 Corinthians 13:9ff as an indicator of any major eschatological, doctrinal, covenantal, or revelatory shift is to miss the point of the passage entirely.”

McDurmon set out to show that “that which is perfect” is “spiritual maturity” on the part of individuals, and does not deal with the corporate body. In other words, the miraculous gifts were given to individuals (which no one denies), and the purpose, intent and goal of those gifts was to bring those individuals to spiritual maturity. When those particular individuals reached that state of maturity then the operation of the gifts in that individual would cease: “It is most reasonable to view the passing here (of the active function of the gifts, DKP) as the passing away in relationship to the individuals who were actually using the gifts- not as a type of gift taken as a bibilical abstraction.”

Read more: Joel McDurmon on 1 Corinthians 13-- A Response - #2

Joel McDurmon on 1 Corinthians 13-- A Response - #5

This is the fifth installment a series examining an article by Joel McDurmon, Head of Research at American Vision in Powder Springs, Ga.,  in which he addressed the question of the charismatic, revelatory gifts, and particularly 1 Corinthians 13. Be sure to read the first four installments:  #1   #2   #3   #4

Read more: Joel McDurmon on 1 Corinthians 13-- A Response - #5

Joel McDurmon on 1 Corinthians 13-- A Response - #1

Just recently, John MacArthur ignited a firestorm of controversy by assailing the entire charismatic community as devilish and heretical. Needless to say, the responses from the charismatic community have been “energetic” and enthusiastic, to say the least.

Joel McDurmon, Head of Research at American Vision, in Powder Springs, GA, wrote a response to MacArthur in which he admitted that there is a great deal of abuse in the charismatic world, which he had personally witnessed while being a member of the charismatic movement for over five years, yet, he defended the movement as a whole.

Then, in a follow-up article, on 1 Corinthians 13, McDurmon wrote an article in which he offered his distinctive take on 1 Corinthians 13. McDurmon rejects 1 Corinthians 13 as eschatological: “I think that the whole endeavor to see 1 Corinthians 13:9ff as an indicator of any major eschatological, doctrinal, covenantal, or revelatory shift is to miss the point of the passage entirely.”

Frankly, McDurmon’s article is, in my estimation, quite stunning and revealing. In a series of articles I want to address and respond to McDurmon’s claims, and demonstrate the fallacy of them. I want to begin with McDurmon’s claim that the arrival of “that which is perfect” is not an eschatological referent at all.

Read more: Joel McDurmon on 1 Corinthians 13-- A Response - #1


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